The Puerto Rico video displays a number of pieces of information on each frame.  This amounts to a mass of information.

One of the first baby steps involved in an analysis of the footage is to extract at least some of that mass of information.

This page seeks share to share some of that information in a spreadsheet format to allow for cross-checking, additions and analysis.

The spreadsheet below gives pertinent information for various frames, with the columns containing the information indicated on the labelled screenshot below (e.g. Column A states the relevant frame number, Column B states the relevant URL for that frame, Column C states the date).

A fuller key indicating the contents of the various columns is also given below.



 

Data extracted from the video is included in the spreadsheet at the link below (which is rapidly being developed and will be replaced shortly):

http://prrr.isaackoi.com/working/frames%20data.xlsm 



A draft of this spreadsheet is also on Google Sheets at the link below (again, since the spreadsheet is rapidly being developed the spreadsheet and/or link will change shortly):

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1EwrRAG3hnRWfYzeQw6u-DIWhlu244ZtUY3HeJKW7HoU/pubhtml 

 

VERY rough draft of key:

A: Frame number

B: URL for relevant frame

C: Time Code (minutes)

D: Time Code (seconds)

E: Time Code (frames)

F: Date : States “26Apr2013” throughout video, i.e. 26 April 2013

G: Time (hours). The time display is in format HH:MM:SS. Increases from 01:22:07 to 01:26:01 (i.e. 3 minutes 54 seconds) during the video, which has a duration of 3 minutes 54 seconds – prima facie indicating that the video is continuous footage.

H: Time (minutes)

I: Time (seconds)

J: Time Zone indication. States “UTC+1.0” throughout video. Prima facie this indicates that [insert].

K: States “Ground track” throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

L: States “AUTO” throughout the video. This indicates [insert]

M: States “VIC” throughout the video. This indicates [insert]

N: States “COR-A” throughout the video. This indicates [insert]

O: States “IR” (Infra-Red) throughout the video. This indicates the mode used (i.e. infra-red as opposed to electro-optical).

P: Indicates zoom. The camera consists of three different cameras in one Electro optical Wide 10-200mm zoom, Electro Optical Narrow at 955mm and The Infra-Red camera with zooms at 27, 135, 675, and 2024mm. This number increases and decreases a few times during the video (with values of 135, 675, 2024) – i.e. the Infra-Red camera zoom values.

Q: States “AUTO” throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

R: States a rapidly changing number, with values between approximately [3,500] and [15,500]. The number indicates the distance from the aircraft to the target, in meters. The target is the object detected by the relevant sensor at the centre of the cross-hairs, which is usually the ground rather than any object in the air.

S: States “DFLT” throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

T: States “AUTO” throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

U: This compass shows [insert - ?the direction of true north relative to the crosshairs?]. This compass begins by pointing directly to the right (a position that indicates [insert]) and rotates clockwise to end just to the right of straight up (a position that indicates [insert]). The gradual clockwise rotation during the course of the video indicates [insert].

V: This readout shows values between approximately [+2.5] to [-0.5]. The number is [insert - ?the elevation angle relative to the aircraft, meaning…?].

W: Cross-hairs, indicating the centre of the camera’s view.

Z: States “LI: Disarm” thoughout the video. This indicates [insert - ?Laser Illuminator disarmed/off?].

Y: States “LI: Off” thoughout the video. This indicates [insert - ?Laser Illuminator disarmed/off?].

Z: This readout shows values between approximately [19] to [29]. The number indicates the bearing of the camera in relation to the front of the airplane. The values displayed on the screen are missing a "zero", i.e. 26 is actually 260 degrees. The heading of the aircraft added to this value will give you the azimuth. If the value comes up greater than 360 degrees (as it often does), one has to subtract 360 degrees.

AA: States “ACFT (short for “Aircraft”) throughout the video. This indicates that the numbers (which are co-ordinates) below that word relate to the position of the aircraft.

AB, AC, AD, AE: These numbers, which changes frequently, give the latitude of the aircraft (e.g. 18:30:22N). The latitude indicates a north-south position. The equator is defined as 0 degrees, the North Pole is 90 degrees north, and the South Pole is 90 degrees south. One degree of latitude is 60 nautical miles, 69 statute miles or 111 km. One minute of latitude is 1 nautical mile, 1.15 statute miles, or 1.85 km.

AF, AG, AH AI: These numbers, which changes frequently, give the longtitude of the aircraft (e.g. 67:05:48W). Lines of longitude, or meridians, run between the North and South Poles. They measure east-west position. The prime meridian is assigned the value of 0 degrees, and runs through Greenwich, England. Meridians to the west of the prime meridian are measured in degrees west.

AJ: This number (in degrees) indicates the aircraft’s bearing i.e. the direction in which the aircraft is heading. This reading is 11 degrees at the start of the video (indicating that the aircraft was heading [insert – slightly east of north]), drops to zero (i.e. north), starts again at 359 degrees (i.e. slightly west of north and decreases to approximately 137 degrees at 2 minutes 12 seconds (indicating that the aircraft was then heading slightly east of south). The gradual decrease in the relevant numbers during the course of the first 2 minutes 12 seconds of the video indicates aircraft was turning [insert]. The reading after 2 minutes 12 seconds varies slowly and only by a few degrees in the 1 minute 42 seconds (indicating that during this time the aircraft was heading almost in a straight line).

AK: This number, followed by “FT” (short for “feet”), indicates the aircraft’s altitude in feet (?above sea level?).

AL: This number, followed by “FT” (short for “feet”), indicates the target’s altitude in feet (?above sea level?). The target is the object detected by the relevant sensor at the centre of the cross-hairs, which is usually the ground rather than any object in the air.

AM: This number (in degrees) indicates the bearing of the cross-hairs of the camera i.e. the direction in which the camera is pointing.

AN: This number, followed by “NM” (short for nautical miles), indicates the distance of the target from the camera. The target is the object detected by the relevant sensor at the centre of the cross-hairs, which is usually the ground rather than any object in the air.

AO: States “OFF” throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

AP: States “NONE” throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

AQ: States “TGT” (short for “Target”) throughout the video. This indicates that the numbers (which are co-ordinates and distance/bearing information) below that word relate to the position of the target. The target is the object detected by the relevant sensor at the centre of the cross-hairs, which is usually the ground rather than any object in the air.

AR: States “LOS” (short for “Line Of Sight”) throughout the video. This indicates [insert].

AS, AT, AU, AV: These numbers, which changes frequently, give the latitude of the target (e.g. 18:29:59N). The target is the object detected by the relevant sensor at the centre of the cross-hairs, which is usually the ground rather than any object in the air. The latitude indicates a north-south position. The equator is defined as 0 degrees, the North Pole is 90 degrees north, and the South Pole is 90 degrees south. One degree of latitude is 60 nautical miles, 69 statute miles or 111 km. One minute of latitude is 1 nautical mile, 1.15 statute miles, or 1.85 km.

AW, AX, AY, AZ: These numbers, which changes frequently, give the longtitude of the target (e.g. 67:09:21W). The target is the object detected by the relevant sensor at the centre of the cross-hairs, which is usually the ground rather than any object in the air. Lines of longitude, or meridians, run between the North and South Poles. They measure east-west position. The prime meridian is assigned the value of 0 degrees, and runs through Greenwich, England. Meridians to the west of the prime meridian are measured in degrees west.

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